Elevated Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Severe Gambling Disorder: A Pilot Study in U.S. Veterans

Authors

  • Toby Chen College of Arts and Sciences, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA
  • Heather Chapman Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio, USA School of Medicine, Case Western University, Cleveland, Ohio, US
  • P Eric Konicki Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; School of Medicine, Case Western University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
  • Peijun Chen Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; School of Medicine, Case Western University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
  • George E Jaskiw Department of Psychiatry, Veterans Affairs Northeast Ohio Healthcare System, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; School of Medicine, Case Western University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4309/jgi.2021.48.12

Keywords:

adverse childhood experiences, gambling disorder, veterans

Abstract

Gambling disorder (GD) is associated with a higher prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). Whether this applies to groups such as U.S. veterans, who already have elevated ACEs, is not known. In this pilot study, we extracted ACEs from the charts of a random sample (n = 19) male veterans in residential GD treatment and compared them to those from a general veteran sample (n =154, 30 females, 124 males). The GD group had an elevated prevalence (79% vs. 37%) of three or more ACEs and a lower prevalence (5% vs. 49%) of one or fewer ACEs. Within groups with elevated ACEs, higher ACE load may still confer a higher risk of adult GD.

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Published

2021-09-23

Issue

Section

Clinic